Thursday, October 20, 2011

Archive upgrades, II

A thousand is a lot, when it is a thousand articles that have to be checked for complete citations, typos, and formatting, and assigned to enough categories and index pages to be findable. The work on cleaning up and standardizing the Libertarian Labyrinth archive has already been both a lot of work and a lot of fun. As I've mentioned before, much of my accumulation of texts has been done at times when there was little leisure, or too much distraction, to take as much time with them as I would have liked. So while I've been doing a lot of moderately tedious work making sure details are correct (and there's still a couple more rounds to go before I can be certain that things like original formatting are all in order) I've also be rediscovering a lot of material that I've only had a chance to glance at in the past: Stephen Pearl Andrews' temperance addresses, Hugh O. Pentecost on "mental healing," Francis D. Tandy's articles on librarianship and Steven T. Byington's articles on bee-keeping, alongside more political works. This little gem from Byington is perhaps representative of the less conventional "finds:"



Altogether
To The Editor Of The Nation:
Sir: Can you, in spite of the war, find room for an appeal to the dictionaries on behalf of the word “altogether”? My complaint is that the dictionaries neglect the use of this adverb with the meaning “in all,” usually (though not invariably) with numerical statements; thus, “this makes twenty-seven books altogether”; “there is enough of it altogether to make a good dinner.” The proof that this familiar usage belongs to the compound “altogether” and not to the separated words “all together” is of various kinds: First, the traditional usage of those who have written the word in the past. Second, the two are often distinguishable in sense. Take examples from textbooks of arithmetic. “If three ladies come into the room at five minutes past four, and six at ten minutes past, and four at fifteen minutes past, how many come in altogether?” We mean the whole thirteen; “all together” would suggest the thought of those who come at the same moment. “If one boy raised ten chickens, and another boy sixteen, and another boy thirty-seven, how many did they raise altogether?” Here “all together” would give the same substantial sense, but with different syntax; “all together” would grammatically relate to the boys, “altogether” to the chickens. Third, “altogether” in this sense is never pronounced with two principal accents nor with a pause after “all” or a prolongation of that syllable. Fourth, there is not the same liberty of tmesis nor of omission of “all” that would be natural if the two words had their separate force. Fifth, if you use the adverb with the smallest numbers (which, to be sure, is not common), you say “there were only two of us altogether,” not “both together.”
Therefore, let the dictionaries take cognizance of this very common use.
Steven T. Byington
Ballard Vale, Mass., May 9


Of course, this business of discovery means that "a thousand" has a tendency to multiply. Every check or double-check for a missing reference is as likely as not to unearth a new item, or a new appearance of a known item, or some other archive-worthy material in the same volume. I think the number of articles in the archive has grown by almost twenty percent in the course of working through less than twenty percent of the existing entries. When all the entries have been worked over, there will be another logical round of follow-up, combing through those periodicals which I haven't yet had a chance to really "mine," and that will probably involve some more research travel in 2012.

So, the work completed tends to create more work, but I'm also getting a sense that the complete archiving of a fairly substantial group of key texts is well on its way to completion. The Tucker publications are mostly "in hand," with the exception of The Transatlantic and The Weekly Bulletin of Newspaper and Periodical Literature, and just require a lot of transcription hours to be really usable. The major works of William B. Greene and Joshua King Ingalls, and roughly half the works of Josiah Warren are free online in one form or another (or could be with a few hours of transcription.) Mother Earth is largely available, though the various archives are all incomplete. In some ways, that's just a drop in the bucket, even where American texts are concerned, but it's still a pretty substantial chunk of our literary heritage preserved or preservable in our own hands. And that is heartening.

What else is in the Libertarian Labyrinth, besides bee-keeping and a lot of old mutualist texts? Here, for your amusement, is a sort of semi-random selection, the first 200+ articles that are all fitted up with metadata and have complete (or, in a few cases, nearly complete, awaiting some further research and/or travel) citations:


Leonard D. Abbott, “A Few Words about Ferdinand Earle,” Mother Earth 2, no. 8 (October 1907): 344-347.
Leonard D. Abbott, “A Priestess of Pity and of Vengeance,” Mother Earth 7, no. 7 (September 1912): 230-232.
Stephen Pearl Andrews, “Abolition Reasons against Disunion,” Young American’s Magazine of Self-Improvement 1, no. 3 (May 1847): 159-166.
Stephen Pearl Andrews, “Address by Stephen Pearl Andrews to His Fellow-Citizens on the Situation,” The Index 8, no. 39 (August 8, 1877): 377.
Stephen Pearl Andrews, H. E. Morrill, and O. Eastman, “Address Of the Southwestern Temperance Convention, to the People of the Southwestern Portion of the United States,” Journal of the American Temperance Union 1, no. 7 (July 1837): 98-99.
Stephen Pearl Andrews, “Phonotypy and Phonography, or Speech-Printing and Speech-Writing,” Young American’s Magazine of Self-Improvement 1, no. 1 (January 1847): 55-60.
Alexander Berkman, “A Greeting,” Mother Earth 1, no. 4 (June 1906): 3-6.
Peter I. Blacker, “The Perpetuity of the Union,” The Boston Investigator 26, no. 9 (June 25, 1856): 2.
Lewis H. Blair, A Standard of Value Considered in its Relation to Currency (Richmond, VA.: Everett Waddey Company, 1893).
Calvin Blanchard, A Crisis Chapter on Government (New York: Calvin Blanchard, 1865.).
George E. Bowen, “Among the Ashes,” Mother Earth 2, no. 2 (April 1907): 86-89.
Estella Bachman Brokaw, “An Afternoon Call,” The New Crusade 11, no. 3 (May 1900): 30-33.
Steven T. Byington, “Altogether,” The Nation 106, no. 2765 (June 29, 1918): 757.
Steven T. Byington, “Limiting Jurisdiction,” The Typographical Journal 21, no. 7 (October 1, 1902): 302.
Steven T. Byington, “The Number of Workers,” The Typographical Journal 21, no. 12 (December 15, 1902): 529.
Steven T. Byington, “The Union Label,” The Typographical Journal 21, no. 12 (December 15, 1902): 516.
William Henry Channing, “A Confession of Faith,” The Present 1, no. 1 (September 1843): 6-10.
Joseph Conrad. “An Anarchist,” A Set of Six (New York: Doubleday, 1908) 163-198.
Christopher Pearse Cranch, “A Prayer,” The Present 1, no. 1 (September 1843): 10.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “American Progress,” The Open Court 5, no. 41 (December 3, 1891): 3040-3042.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Anarchism and American Traditions,” Mother Earth 3, no. 10 (December 1908): ??.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Anarchism and American Traditions (conclusion),” Mother Earth 3, no. 11 (January 1909): 386-??.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “C. L. James,” Mother Earth 6, no. 5 (July 1911): 142-144.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Case of the Imprisoned Italians in Philadelphia,” Mother Earth 3, no. 8 (October 1908): 324-326.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Commune is Risen,” Mother Earth 7, no. 1 (March 1912): 10-15.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “A Correction,” Mother Earth 2, no. 10 (December 1907): 473.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Dominant Idea,” Mother Earth 5, no. 3 (May 1910): 81-87.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Dominant Idea (Conclusion),” Mother Earth 5, no. 4 (June 1910): 133-140.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Discussion at Meetings,” Mother Earth 6, no. 1 (March 1911): 23-24.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Economic Relations of Sex,” The Open Court 5, no. 11 (May 7, 1891): 2801-2802.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Economic Tendency of Freethought,” Liberty 6, no. 25 (February 15, 1890): 3-7.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Events are the True Schoolmasters,” Mother Earth 1, no. 11 (January 1907): 19-22.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Free Speech Fight in Philadelphia,” Mother Earth 4, no. 8 (October 1909): 237-239.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “A Glance at Communism,” The Twentieth Century ??, no. ?? (September 1, 1892): 10-11.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Hugh O. Pentecost,” Mother Earth 2, no. 1 (March 1907): 11-16.
Voltairine de Cleyre and Rosa Slobodinsky, “The Individualist and the Communist,” The Twentieth Century 6, no. ?? (June 18, 1891): 3-6.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “James's Vindication of Anarchism,” Mother Earth 1, no. 7 (September 1906): 30.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Katherine Karg Harker—Obituary,” The Free Thought Magazine 14, no. 6 (June 1896): 387-389.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Kristofer Hansteen,” Mother Earth 1, no. 3 (May 1906): 52-56.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “A Lance for Anarchy,” The Open Court 5, no. ?? (September 24, 1891): 2963-2965.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Making of an Anarchist,” The Independent 55, no. 2860 (September 24, 1903): 2276-2280.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “McKinley's Assassination from the Anarchist Standpoint,” Mother Earth 2, no. 8 (October 1907): 303-306.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Mexican Revolt,” Mother Earth 6, no. 6 (August 1911): 167-171.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Mexican Revolution,” Mother Earth 6, no. 10 (December 1911): 301-306.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Mexican Revolution (continuation),” Mother Earth 6, no. 11 (January 1912): 335-341.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Mexican Revolution (conclusion),” Mother Earth 6, no. 12 (February 1912): 374-380.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Note,” Mother Earth 5, no. 6 (August 1910): 191.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Note,” Mother Earth 5, no. 8 (October 1910): 272.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “November 11, Twenty Years Ago,” Mother Earth 2, no. 9 (November 1907): 368-374.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “On Liberty,” Mother Earth 4, no. 5 (July 1909): 151-155.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “An Open Letter,” Mother Earth 1, no. 7 (September 1906): 4-7.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Open Your Eyes,” Mother Earth 3, no. 3 (May 1908): 156-159.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Our Police Censorship,” Mother Earth 4, no. 9 (November 1909): 297-301.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Our Present Attitude,” Mother Earth 3, no. 2 (April 1908): 78-80.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Philadelphia Farce,” Mother Earth 3, no. 5 (July 1908): 217-??.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Philadelphia Strike,” Mother Earth 5, no. 1 (March 1910): 7-10.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Philosophy of Selfishness and Metaphysical Ethics,” The Open Court 5, no. 20 (July 9, 1891): 2871-2873.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Release of Michael Costello,” Mother Earth 4, no. 4 (June 1909): 125-??.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Report Concerning the Italian Prisoners in Philadelphia,” Mother Earth 3, no. 11 (January 1909): 397-??.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Report of the Work of the Chicago Mexican Liberal Defense League,” Mother Earth 7, no. 2 (April 1912): 60-??.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Reviews.—The Curse of Race Prejudice,” Mother Earth 1, no. 7 (September 1906): 34-37.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Some Questions and Criticisms,” Liberty 7, no. 4 (June 21, 1890): 5.
Benjamin Tucker, “Response to ‘Some Questions and Criticisms’,” Liberty 7, no. 4 (June 21, 1890): 5.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “A Study of the General Strike in Philadelphia,” Mother Earth 5, no. 2 (April 1910): 39-44.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “They Who Marry Do Ill,” Mother Earth 2, no. 11 (January 1908): 500-511.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Tour Impressions,” Mother Earth 5, no. 10 (December 1910): 322-325.
Emma Goldman, “A Rejoinder,” Mother Earth 5, no. 10 (December 1910): 325-328.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Tour Impressions,” Mother Earth 5, no. 11 (January 1911): 360-363.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Why I Am an Anarchist,” Mother Earth 3, no. 1 (March 1908): 16-31.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Ahasuerus,” The Open Court 8, no. 40 (October 4, 1894): 4246.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Death Shall Not Part Ye More,” The Open Court 8, no. 13 (March 29, 1894): 4026-4027.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “I Am,” The Open Court 6, no. 3 (January 21, 1892): 3118-3119.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “In Memoriam. To Gen. M. M. Trumbull,” The Open Court 7, no. 29 (July 19, 1894): 4158.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “John P. Altgeld,” The Open Court 7, no. ?? (August 24, 1893): 3782.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Life or Death,” The Open Court 6, no. 26 (June 30, 1892): 3302.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Stonehenge,” The Open Court 18, no. 11 (November 1904): 699-700.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Ut Sementem Feceris, Ita Metes,” The Open Court 4, no. 23 (July 30, 1890): 2427.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Ut Sementem Feceris, Ita Metes,” Mother Earth 1, no. 3 (May 1906): 25.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The Gilded Edge of Hell,” The Boston Investigator ??, no. 25 (October 8, 1890): 2.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “She Died for Me,” The Open Court 9, no. ?? (December 26, 1895): 4756-4757.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “Where the White Rose Died,” Mother Earth 3, no. 1 (March 1908): 44-48.
Voltairine de Cleyre, “The White Room,” The Open Court 10, no. 24 (June 11, 1896): 4945-4946.
Elisabeth Burns Ferm, “Activity and Passivity of the Educator,” Mother Earth 2, no. 1 (March 1907): 25-36.
Jay Fox, “What's To Be Done?,” International Wood Worker 14, no. 7 (July 1904): 311-312.
Emma Goldman, “A Letter,” Mother Earth 1, no. 4 (June 1906): 13-14.
Emma Goldman, “A New Declaration of Independence,” Mother Earth 4, no. 5 (July 1909): 137-138
Bolton Hall, “Academic Teaching,” Life 38, no. 991 (October 31, 1901): 343.
Bolton Hall, “Apples of Sodom,” The Independent 53, no. 2734 (April 25, 1901): 951.
Bolton Hall, “A Celestial Conversation,” The Public 1, no. 33 (November 19, 1898): 11-12.
Bolton Hall, “A Conservative,” The Independent 53, no. 2734 (April 25, 1901): 950.
Bolton Hall, “Declaration of Children's Independence,” The Outlook 59, no. 7 (June 18, 1898): 431.
Bolton Hall, “The Disease of Charity,” The American Journal of Politics 4, no. 3 (March 1894): 225-232.
Bolton Hall, “A Dollar Reason,” Life 43, no. 1119 (April 7, 1904): 330.
Bolton Hall, “A Dollar Reason,” The Public 7, no. 316 (April 23, 1904): 42.
Bolton Hall, “The Effect of Taxation on Pauperism,” The Charities Review 1, no. 3 (January 1892): 115-121.
Bolton Hall, “Emerson the Anarchist,” The Arena 37, no. 209 (April 1907): 400-404.
Bolton Hall, “Failures of the Ages,” Mind 1, no. 3 (December 1897): 176.
Bolton Hall, “The Fruits of Unearned Wealth,” The Independent 53, no. 2734 (April 25, 1901): 950-951.
Bolton Hall, “The Growth of Socialism,” The Christian Union 47, no. 22 (June 3, 1893): 1067.
Bolton Hall, “Happiness and Aggression,” Liberty 11, no. 20 (February 8, 1896): 6.
Bolton Hall, “How 'Progress' Stopped,” The Arena 22, no. 4 (October 1899): 530-535.
Bolton Hall, “The Joy of the Working,” The Outlook 58, no. 2 (January 8, 1898): 127.
Bolton Hall, “The Land and the Mind,” Mind 5, no. 1 (October 1899): 30-33.
Bolton Hall, “Leaven: A Parable,” Twentieth Century Magazine 3, no. 15 (December 1910): 244.
Bolton Hall, “The Lords of the Air,” The Arena 21, no. 3 (March 1899): 293-295.
Bolton Hall, “Lying as a Devotion,” The Conservator 5, no. 2 (April 1894): 21.
Bolton Hall, “A Masque of Life,” The Outlook 60, no. 7 (October 15, 1898): 441-442.
Bolton Hall, “The Natural Bent,” Mind 2, no. 3 (June 1898): 143.
Bolton Hall, “The New Charity,” The Arena 16, no. 84 (November 1896): 970-973.
Bolton Hall, “Prosperity,” The Independent 53, no. 2734 (April 25, 1901): 950.
Bolton Hall, “A Reformer's Sympathies,” The Public 7, no. 351 (December 24, 1904): 603.
Bolton Hall, “Rise and Progress of a Soul,” Mind 2, no. 6 (September 1898): 327.
Bolton Hall, “School Gardens as Object Lessons,” The Public 7, no. 362 (March 11, 1905): 783.
Bolton Hall, “Seen from Above,” Mind 4, no. 6 (September 1899): 368.
Bolton Hall, “Separate From Sinners” The Public 1, no. 52 (April 1, 1899): 9.
Bolton Hall, “The Servant Class on the Farm and in the Slums,” The Arena 20, no. 3 (September 1898): 373-377.
Bolton Hall, “A Social Arrangement,” The San Jose Letter 4, No. 26 (November 28 1896): 7.
Bolton Hall, “A Subject for ‘The Human Improvement Society’,” The Independent 53, no. 2734 (April 25, 1901): 950.
Bolton Hall, “The Taxation of Farmers,” The Christian Union 46, no. 26 (December 24, 1892): 1250.
Bolton Hall, “Their Works do Follow Them,” The Outlook 57, no. 5 (October 2, 1897): 332.
Bolton Hall, “Tolstoi's Ideal of the True Life,” The Outlook 54, no. 24 (December 12, 1896): 1099.
Bolton Hall, “The Tree of Equity,” The Arena 16, no. 80 (July 1896): 207.
Bolton Hall, “Unsuccessful Diagnosis,” Life 52, no. 1359 (November 12, 1908): 527.
Bolton Hall. “Vacant Lot Cultivation.” Social Progress. Josiah Strong, ed. New York: Baker and Taylor, 1906. 288-289.
Bolton Hall, “Vacant-Lot Farming,” The Outlook 54, no. 13 (September 26, 1898): 578.
Bolton Hall, “A Vision of Mercy,” Mind 7, no. 1 (October 1900).
Bolton Hall, “What My Char-Woman Said to Me,” The Arena 39, no. 218 (January 1908): 68.
Bolton Hall, “The Wing of Love,” The Whim 2, no. 2 (September 1901): 118-119.
Moses Harman, “A Free Lover’s Creed,” The Free Thought Magazine 15, no. 4 (April 1897): 145-150.
Milo Hastings, “A Solution of the Housing Problem in the United States,” Journal of the American Institute of Architects 7, no. 6 (June 1919): 259-266.
May Huntley (pseudonym of Lizzie M. Holmes), “A Common Story Seldom Told,” Our New Humanity 1, no. 1 (September 1895): 65-68.
Lizzie M. Holmes, “Woman's Future Position in the World,” The Arena 20, no. 3 (September 1898): 333-343.
Lizzie M. Holmes, “The World's Beautiful Failures,” Mother Earth 2, no. 4 (June 1907): 184-189.
Joshua King Ingalls, “Address to Commonwealers,” The Twentieth Century 13, no. 2 (July 12, 1894): 11. (poem)
Joshua King Ingalls, “A Practical Movement for Transition,” The Spirit of the Age 2, no. 13 (March 30, 1850): 202-204.
Joshua King Ingalls, “A Review: Labor and Other Capital,” Univercoelum and Spiritual Philosopher 3, no. 21 (April 21, 1849): 321-323.
Joshua King Ingalls, “A Review: Labor and Other Capital,” Univercoelum and Spiritual Philosopher 3, no. 22 (April 28, 1849): 337-339.
Joshua King Ingalls, “A Sermon, Delivered in the Universalist Church, Southold, L. I.,” Universalist Union 5, no. 41 (August 29, 1840): 641-644.
C. L. James, “A Defence of Intuitionalism,” The Index 2, no. 19 (May 13, 1871): 151.
Samuel Milton Jones, “A Plea for Simpler Living,” The Arena 29, no. 4 (April 1903): 345-348.
Gertrude B. Kelly, “A Letter of Protest,” Liberty 5, no. 1 (August 13, 1887): 7.
Harry Kelly, “A Syndicalist League,” Mother Earth 7, no. 7 (September 1917): 218-223.
Peter Kropotkin, “A Greeting,” Mother Earth 7, no. 11 (January 1913): 363.
Peter Kropotkin, “On the Present Condition of Russia,” The Outlook 58, no. 2 (January 8, 1898): 113-117.
Herman Kuehn, “The Things that are not Caesar's,” Everybody’s Magazine 30, no. 6 (June 1914): 804-805.
 “A Carolinian” [Marx Edgeworth Lazarus], “Abolition of Slavery,” The Spirit of the Age 1, no. 19 (November 10, 1849): 291-293.
“A Carolinian” [Marx Edgeworth Lazarus], “Abolition of Slavery,” The Spirit of the Age 1, no. 20 (November 17, 1849): 308-309.
Marx Edgeworth Lazarus, “Administrative Nihilism,” The Radical Review 2, no. 13 (May 10, 1884): 4-6.
Samuel Leavitt, “A Fair Exchange No Robbery,” The Phrenological Journal and Science of Health 61, no. 6 (December 1875): 390-393.
J. William Lloyd, “Co-operative Free Money,” Liberty 6, no. 21 (April 24, 1890): 6.
J. William Lloyd, “Running as an Exercise,” Journal of Hygiene and Herald of Health 45, no. 5 (May 1895): 126-130.
J. William Lloyd, “A Race for Health,” Health 8, no. 5 (November 1899): 170-173.
J. William Lloyd, “Forced or Free—The Two Socialisms,” The Whim 2, no. 6 (January 1902): 169-174.
J. William Lloyd, “An Eaves-Dropper of Nature,” The Comrade 2, no. 2 (November 1902): 27-28.
J. William Lloyd, “Life's Good in Evil,” Mind 15, no. 1 (January 1905): 39-41.
J. William Lloyd, “From Supremacy to Liberty and Love,” Mind 15, no. 4 (April 1905): 373-374.
J. William Lloyd, “The Enlarging of Love to Liberty,” Mind 16, no. 4 (October 1905): 898-899.
J. William Lloyd, “Courage, the Life Word,” Mind 16, no. 5 (November 1905): 1001-1002.
J. William Lloyd, “The Ethics of Sex,” To-Morrow 2, no. 6 (June 1906): 32-36.
J. William Lloyd, “Honorable War,” The Forum 54, no. 3 (September 1915): 305-312.
J. William Lloyd, “A Page of Friendly Criticism,” The Birth Control Review 2, no. 5 (June 1919): 9.
J. William Lloyd, “Moses Harman,” Liberty 7, no. 2 (April 24, 1890): 1. (poem)
J. William Lloyd, “Third Avatar of Woman,” Our New Humanity 1, no. 1 (September 1895): 64. (poem)
J. William Lloyd, “A Grandeur and a Dreaming,” The Whim 2, no. 2 (September 1901): 110. (poem)
J. William Lloyd, “An Ocean Prayer,” Free Society 10, no. 23 (June 7, 1903): 1. (poem)
London Anarchist Communist Alliance, An Anarchist Manifesto (London: London Anarchist Communist Alliance, 1895).
Dyer D. Lum, “Axioms,” The Boston Investigator 30, no. 31 (November 21, 1860): 242.
Dyer D. Lum, “The Character Spook,” The Twentieth Century ??, no. ?? (May 14, 1891): 7-8.
Dyer D. Lum, “Cure Meslier,” The Boston Investigator 27, no. 5 (May 27, 1857): 2.
Dyer D. Lum, “The First Christians,” The Boston Investigator 27, no. 36 (December 30, 1857): 1.
Dyer D. Lum, “Infidels Should Avow Their Sentiments,” The Boston Investigator 27, no. 11 (July 8, 1857): 1.
Sidney H. Morse, “About Abolishing the State,” Liberty 5, no. 1 (August 13, 1887): 6.
Sidney H. Morse, “About Abolishing the State,” Liberty 5, no. 2 (August 27, 1887): 6.
Henry Olerich, “What the American Civil War Has Not Done,” The American Journal of Politics 3, no. 6 (December 1893): 628-634.
Hugh O. Pentecost, “Is Mental Healing Scientific,” Mind 4, no. 2 (May 1899): 64-70.
Hugh O. Pentecost, “The Tyranny of Family Love,” To-Morrow 2, no. 3 (March 1906): 22-23.
Hugh O. Pentecost, “Anarchism,” Mother Earth 2, no. 2 (April 1907): 100-106.
John Franklyn Phillips, “A Railway Episode,” Mother Earth 2, no. 4 (June 1907): 194-196.
Wendell Phillips, “Abolition Reasons for Disunion,” Young American’s Magazine of Self-Improvement 1, no. 2 (March 1847): 113-120.
Ben L. Reitman, “A Visit to London,” Mother Earth 5, no. 8 (October 1910): 250-254.
Victor Robinson, “Americanism,” Mother Earth 2, no. 1 (March 1907): 24-25.
Victor Robinson, “College Education,” Mother Earth 2, no. 2 (April 1907): 72-76.
Alfred Seelye Roe, “A Sketch of the First Massachusetts Heavy Artillery,” The Melvin Memorial (Cambridge, MA: The Riverside Press, 1910). [William B. Greene]
Nathaniel G. Simonds, “A Novel Step in Business,” The Boston Investigator 32, no. 50 (April 15, 1863): 393.
Lysander Spooner, “Distressing Problems,” Liberty 1, no. 7 (October 29, 1881): 3.
Lysander Spooner, “Guiteau’s ‘Malice’,” Liberty 1, no. 10 (December 10, 1881): 2.
Lysander Spooner, “Guiteau’s ‘Devilish Depravity’,” Liberty 1, no. 11 (December 24, 1881): 2.
Lysander Spooner, “Guiteau's Wit,” Liberty 1, no. 11 (December 24, 1881): 3.
Lysander Spooner, “Justice Gray,” Liberty 1, no. 12 (January 7, 1882): 2.
Lysander Spooner, “The Guiteau Experts,” Liberty 1, no. 12 (January 7, 1882): 2-3.
Lysander Spooner, “Andover Theological Seminary,” Liberty 1, no. 20 (May 13, 1882): 2-3.
Lysander Spooner, “War upon Superstitious Women,” Liberty 1, no. 24 (July 22, 1882): 2.
Lysander Spooner, “The Forms of Law,” Liberty 1, no. 24 (July 22, 1882): 3-4.
Lysander Spooner, “Ben Butler's Piety,” Liberty 2, no. 8 (March 17, 1883): 3-4.
Lysander Spooner, “The Troubles of Law-Making in Massachusetts,” Liberty 2, no. 14 (October 6, 1883): 3-4.
Lysander Spooner, “The Death of Chinese Gordon,” Liberty 3, no. 7 (February 28, 1885): 4-5.
Lysander Spooner, “Elizur Wright,” Liberty 3, no. 18 (November 28, 1885): 4.
“O” (Lysander Spooner), “Coming to Its Senses,” Liberty 4, no. 3 (May 22, 1886): 5.
“O” (Lysander Spooner), “Confession of an Atrocious Crime Against the Anarchists Tried at Chicago,” Liberty 4, no. 9 (September 18, 1886): 4-5.
“O” (Lysander Spooner), “Chicago Anarchists,” Liberty 4, no. 12 (December 11, 1886): 5. Benjamin R. Tucker, “A Game That Two Can Play At,” Liberty 1, no. 14 (February 18, 1882): 2.
Benjamin R. Tucker, “Our Nestor Taken From Us,” Liberty 4, no. 22 (May 28, 1887): 4-5.
Benjamin R. Tucker, “A Protest,” The Index 8, no. 418 (December 27, 1877): 621.
William Henry Van Ornum, “A Problem in Sociology,” The Arena 25, no. 1 (January 1901): 42-47.
William Henry Van Ornum, “Wheelbarrow and Land Values,” The Open Court 3, no. 80 (March 7, 1889): 1506.
James L. Walker, “A Difference of Words Only,” Liberty 5, no. 17 (March 31, 1888): 7.
James L. Walker, “A Normal Function,” Liberty 5, no. 26 (August 4, 1888): 5.
James L. Walker, “A Reason for Hanging Anarchists,” Liberty 5, no. 11 (December 31, 1887): 4.
James L. Walker, “A Southern Journalist’s Opinion,” Liberty 3, no. 19 (December 12, 1885): 5.
Peter I. Blacker and Josiah Warren, “A Brief Outline of Equitable Commerce,” The Boston Investigator 21, no. 50 (April 14, 1852): 3.
Josiah Warren, “A Letter to Louis Kossuth,” The Boston Investigator 33, no. 41 (February 17, 1864): 321. Josiah Warren and Cosmopolite, “To the Public,” Mechanics Free Press 1, no. 18 (May 10, 1828): 2.
Editor, “A Ten Thousand Dollar Prize,” ''Scientific American'' 8, no. 35 (May 14, 1853): 274. [Stephen Pearl Andrews]
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